Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘aging’

Quote

95 Years of Life Lessons


Today we are headed to a party at the home of my friend, Carol Orr. She is the 95 year old that I wrote about in this blog last year: via 95 Years of Life Lessons

Carol went to her heavenly home a month or so ago… and today her family and friends are gathering to remember her love and share some of her wit and wisdom. Tomorrow is her memorial service.

Click on the link to “95 Years of Life Lessons” above and enjoy Carol’s wit and wisdom with me. Such a bright, “with-it”, fun-loving, kind friend! I miss her!

fullsizeoutput_5563

80 Years Young


I may have just turned 80,

But you can never tell

Unless I first admit it

Because life has treated me well

I still am full of vigor

I’m feisty, keen and healthy

I have a heart so full of love

I’m blessed and spiritually wealthy

I count my blessings every day

And live with gratitude

My family is a source of strength

My great grandkids lift my altitude

This month of July has been

A series of events so dear

I’m glad you’ve shared them with me

By visiting and celebrating with me here

The birthday party was a great success

The food and friends were amazing

One neighbor’s grandson

Kept returning to the table -grazing!

Tenderloin and chicken thighs

Wine and beer and water, too

The guests all brought potluck

Salads, appetizers, and focaccia, too!

The weather cooperated

It didn’t rain til we were in bed

It could have been a nasty day

But it was absolutely perfect instead!

Our dog had fun roaming the yard

And gathering nibbles wherever she went

The house was decorated beautifully

God bless a daughter #2 who’s Heaven-Sent!

My neighbors Janet and Charley

Were helpful beyond all measure

Add Rex & BW who helped set up & clean

They were an absolute treasure!

If you’ve hosted a party

For fifty folks or more,

You know it takes teamwork –

Yup, we had help galore!

I hope when you turn 80,

You feel as equally blessed.

Just count your blessings everyday

And start being that helpful guest!

My heart overflows!

See ya tomorrow

Optimism Brings Positivity


Thanks for joining me on our A-Z journey
to find ways to
Add More Meaning
and
Discover Clearer Purpose
in Life

Today we’ll explore the letters “O” and “P”
Optimism and Positivity

Optimism Brings Positivity!

Or, is it the other way around?

Does Positivity bring Optimism?

I couldn’t separate these two!

positivity potion.jpg

Like so many of the concepts we’ve explored in this A-Z series, these two (optimism and positivity) go hand-in-hand.

When you live with the “Positivity Potion” in your life, optimism is a natural by-product!

I am reminded of a story I have read more than once in various places. It’s about an elderly lady who is being guided down the hallway of a nursing home. The CNA (certified nurse’s assistant) says to her, “Your room is at the end of this hallway.”

The lady smiles at her and cheerfully exclaims, “I like it!”

“But you haven’t seen it yet,” the CNA responds.

“Oh, I know, but I like it.”

This lady had more than a sprinkle of acceptance.
She had more than a hint of gratitude.
She lived with more than a feather of hope.
Her positivity potion was overflowing with optimism about life and her future.

She is someone you’d like to have as your roommate
should the day come when you need to move into a nursing home.

Stay positive.png

These items of advice don’t suddenly become obsolete when you’re retired and don’t have to get up and go to a job every day. In fact, as a person who is aging (aren’t we all?), it is more important than ever that I remain positive in order to be happy.

When I was recovering from a knee replacement and struggling with more pain than I anticipated in the recuperation process, it was more important than ever that I remain positive, keep hope for a better outcome ahead, and work hard to remain happy.

Challenges keep coming.
Life is not a bed of feathery frolicking through the tulips!
It is more important than ever that I continue to work hard
(find meaningful work to maintain a sense of purpose),
and give my days reason to hope.
Not just a feather of hope,
but the whole chirping, red-breasted robin!

animal avian beak bird

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I never can let myself become so rigid, and set in my ways, and sure of my own way of doing things that I grow beyond the need to accept criticism. I must always keep learning. With a positive attitude, I can thank the one who offers the criticism –  thank him or her for sharing an opinion with me – for caring enough to speak their words of correction. Take it in – try the shoe on and see if it fits! And weigh its merits. Keep learning and looking for ways to improve. Always!

With an attitude of optimism
and a demeanor of positivity,
I will attract happy, warm, and generous people.
And I will be one of them.

What better way to approach my 80th birthday – and the days ahead?

 

Bring Optimism and Positivity with you into your tomorrows!

no failure.jpg

Living the Good Life


IMG_6614

Happy 90th birthday, Erma!
Don’t let anybody tell you
You have “Lived a Good Life.”
You tell ’em, “I still am Living it!!”

I had a friend tell me yesterday
That her 88-year-old mom
“Has lived a good life.”
She will soon enter a nursing home.

I have several friends who are
In the Manor, our local spot
For Senior Care – a Nursing Home.
But, they don’t need to stop living!

One of the dearest residents there
Was my friend, Gloria.
She was unable to live alone
For health reasons, but she LIVED!

I’ve told you about Gloria before.
She was my “Angel with invisible wings.”
Her heart stretched miles
With warm smiles, loving and wise.

IMG_5732

This morning we had a Tea Party
Here in Ennis at a local church.
One of my senior friends who is
“Living the Good Life” was there.

fullsizeoutput_556a

Anita is a Senior Companion
Who shovels walks and works tirelessly to
“Help All Those Old Folks!”
She’s at least ten years older than they are!

I wanna be “Anita” when I grow up…
Helping all those old folks!
She’s in her mid-nineties,
And she is “Living the Good Life!”

fullsizeoutput_5563

A few years ago we celebrated
My friend, Carol’s, 90th birthday.
She is “Living the Good Life”
At the Manor right now. Still charming!!

IMG_8998

My friends, Elaine & Bev, celebrated
“The Good Life” at our annual
Christmas Party last December.
Both in their nineties, still vibrant!

Image 3

This dear lady is unknown to me,
But her adorable picture is available
To help folks like me aspire to
“Keep on Living the Good Life.”

Don’t let someone tell you
“You’ve lived a Good Life!”
You tell ’em loud and clear,
“I’m still living it!”

God bless you.
Keep helping those “Old Folks!”
Stay vibrant!!

 

 

See Beauty in Imperfection


sea beach storm tree

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Have you heard of the Japanese word:
Wabi-Sabi?

We don’t have a single English word to translate its meaning.
It takes a whole paragraph!

According to Leonard Koren, who wrote a book
titled Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets, and Philosophers,

“Wabi-Sabi is a beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.
It is a beauty of things modest and humble.
It is a beauty of things unconventional.”

The impermanence of footprints in the sand is an example.

person foot prints on sands photo

Photo by Min An on Pexels.com

 

The modest and humble man here speaks of Wabi-Sabi to me.
Look deep into his eyes. There is beauty in his face.

man person men old

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

I was inspired to write a Haiku X5 on this subject
as I look with fresh vision at the Wabi-Sabi examples around me.

Wabi-Sabi is
The beauty of the withered
Acknowledge decay.

brown wooden shed near green trees

Photo by Spencer Gurley on Pexels.com

Wabi is humble
Sabi is the solitude
Put them together

photo of woman sitting under the tree

Photo by Sơn Bờm on Pexels.com

Wabi-Sabi is
Beauty in humility
Embracing decay.

img_5983

Face imperfection
All things are impermanent
Each of us declines

grayscale photo of man

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Know Wabi-Sabi
Appreciate “ugliness” –
See beauty in it!

man in black and white hoodie

Photo by Donald Teel on Pexels.com

Y = Youthfulness


Day #25 in the A-Z series of “What Makes Me Happy?”

YOUTHFULNESS

My time on earth is

Measured by experience

And development

I maintain an attitude of positivity and youthfulness.

The zeal of youth makes me happy.

My spirit is ageless.

How about you?

alley autumn autumn colours autumn leaves

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

My husband said, “Indecision.”

I said, “That’s not a Y, that’s an I.”

He said, “But it’s a Y in the road.  You have indecision.

You don’t know which way to go.

It doesn’t make me happy, but it makes me think.

Thinking/ pondering/weighing odds – those make me happy…

Because it’s nice to have choices.”

 

Hmmm, creative thinking, don’t you think?

 

What “Y” word makes you happy?

Sixty-Four Years


SIXTY-FOUR YEARS
(a heptameter)

man in black shirt

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

No, this “old coot” (who may have a wonderful sense of humor locked inside, by the way) is not sixty-four. He’s much older… and he reminds me of the subject of the poem below.

It’s a seven-syllable poem. I read somewhere, “Seven-syllable lines in English verse can have several different names.” I call mine heptameter. I heard that somewhere. I didn’t make it up.

Seven syllables on each line… a true story here… first published in our
Madison County Writers Anthology for the year. The subject was a 96-year-old for whom I was a senior companion. He was a hoot of an old coot!

Sixty-four Years

a heptameter

 

The poem rings a loneliness bell, doesn’t it? Ah, but he loved company and he had a million stories locked inside, aching to be told.

Do you know a senior who lives alone? Why not decide to visit today – or give him/her a call.

By the way, doing a little research with Siri, I learned that in English poetry, you only count syllables in Haiku (a form borrowed from another language, of course)… not usually in other poetry forms. Other languages, like French, count syllables in most forms of poetry. The reason English poems don’t was explained this way: English is a stress-timed language, and French is a syllable-timed language. This means that in English, the number of stressed syllables in a line is generally more important than the total number of syllables … (and besides, depending upon what part of the country you’re from, the syllables differ … y’all relate, raught?)

Nevertheless, it was fun to write my Heptameter. You should try it. It’s fun!

Tag Cloud