Loving One Another

Archive for the ‘Family’ Category

He Left Us


He Left Us

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Happy Father’s Day!

I wrote this poem in honor of my dear Dad, Sal DeAngeles, shortly after he  died in April of 1995. I thought this was a good time to pull it out and share it with you, my dear blog readers. I hope you have equally vivid and happy memories of your Father. You can get a pretty good picture of who my daddy was by seeing what he left us… and the things he left behind.

He Left Us

He left us his roses and hydrangeas,
and his garden with zucchini,
but he forgot to take the old wheelbarrow,
and he forgot to take the bocci ball court.
.
He left his mother’s crucifix on my wall,
his watch in the top dresser drawer,
the Balsamic vinegar in the cupboard,
and his love of ravioli and French bread,
but he forgot to take his Gallo Burgundy.
.
He left in each of us his love of family,
his teary-eyed sentimentality, and he left
the aches and pains of his earthly body,
but he forgot to take his spray paint, and
his love of convertibles with the top down.
.
He left the wife he loved so well,
the family and neighbors who miss him so,
and the unconditional love, but he
forgot his collection of nude calendars,
and he forgot to take his twinkle.
I know – I have it!

 

If your dad has left this earth, try writing a poem about what he left and what he forgot to take. Have fun with it!

Happy Sunday.
Happy Father’s Day!

heart of love

See you with my sermon notes after church.
God bless you!

 

 

Bees, Trees, and Water


Bees, Trees and Water

bees trees water

Bees, Trees and Water
Without them we would all die
Preserve them with care

 

All God’s Creation

“Loving One Another” is not just about loving people; it is about loving and caring for all of God’s creation. The plants and animals, and all of nature cry for our attention.

How do you show your love for God’s creatures?

Gotta Love Those Beekeepers!

My husband, Bob, is a retired beekeeper. But, like I say about teachers, “Once a teacher, always a teacher,” well, that’s the case with beekeepers as well.

Beekeepers may sell their hives, trucks, and forklifts, and retire from the work, but the spirit of the hive stays with them forever! We moved from California to Montana and took no hives with us. But there are bee hobbyists right here in Ennis – and it didn’t take long for Bob to find them. He was drawn to them the way a bee is drawn to a nectar source!

animal bee bloom blooming

And, as you know, honeybees have been in the news a lot lately. Bees world-wide are in peril. It’s called CCD = Colony Collapse Disorder. Researchers are busy trying to figure out why whole colonies are dying and beekeepers are losing sometimes up to 1/3 of their hives.

Great Interest in Veteran Beekeepers’ Knowledge

The hobbyist beekeepers, many of whom are new to the scene, appreciate the expertise of veteran beekeepers. Bob was more than happy to lend a hand and get himself back into the groove that was a part of his childhood and a huge portion of his working life.

Jana Bounds, a reporter with the Lone Peak Lookout, was asked to do an article in a local magazine titled, “The Loop.” She contacted Bob and interviewed him. He took her to the site of a local hobbyist beekeeper and spent time describing the situation.

What’s the Problem?

In a nutshell, (or honeybee cell, as the case may be), the problem of disappearing bees is complex, multi-faceted, and not easily labeled. In her article, Jana Bounds quotes my husband, Bob Beekman, as well as Alex McMenamin, PhD student at Montana State University. Both agree, factors like inadequate nutrition, habitat loss, agrochemical exposure, and pathogens are cause for high bee losses.

But, the greatest threat is the Varroa mite. They suck the blood of the larva and spread disease among the bees in the hive. Scientists continue to research, looking for solutions.

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Check out “The Loop” Summer edition, 2019, pages 36 to 39.
It is published by our local Madison County newspaper, The Madisonian.

What Can We Do?

Not many of us are retired beekeepers who can help with hands-on experience. But, we can read and learn, and do our part to help lend support to our beekeepers.

  • Buy local honey
  • Plant flowers and trees that provide good nectar and pollen sources
  • Bees need to be near a water source – keep water pure – don’t pollute
  • Teach children about the value of honeybees (one in every three bites of food we eat is directly or indirectly dependent on bees and their gift of pollination)
  • Avoid use of harmful pesticides
  • Support bee-friendly legislation and research

Beekeepers never die – they just lose their stingers!
Hah! 😉

This is Bob in his younger, beekeeper days:

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Bee Well – Bee Happy – Bee Sweet – Eat Honey!!

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See ya tomorrow

 

 

This is The Day


This is the day

That the Lord has made

I will rejoice

And be glad in it!

I pray you have reasons to rejoice, too.

Tell me one reason!

Thanks for visiting

See you tomorrow

Newness: Reverse Cinquain


abandoned abstract ancient art

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

Endings

Endings are our new beginnings

Every day offers both

Share gratitude

Newness

baby sleeping in a basket and a round feather surrounding the basket

My granddaughter, Hope,
and her husband, Drew,
are expecting their baby girl any day now.

Knowing this is the week
we will lay my friend, Carol, to rest,
and this is the week our grandson,
Chris, is ending his 6 month stay in the USA,
it is fitting that a new beginning
is imminent.

God bless this new life
about to join us!

Hope preg2

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See you tomorrow

 

Reverse Cinquain summary:
• 5-line stanza inspired by the haiku and tanka
• syllabic count: 2-8-6-4-2
• meter optional
• rhyme optional
• titled, where the title is used as a sixth line
• may be centered or left-justified

Then They Were Gone


Then They Were Gone

We had a glorious ten days

With our daughter and her husband

Joined by their son, Chris,

And then they were gone…

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The house is way too quiet!

The whole ten days they were here

The skies were gray and cloudy;

Sometimes the mountains were hidden.

But now we expect blue skies

And temperatures in the 70s!

As soon as they leave,

We finally get decent weather!

Wouldn’t you love to be able

To control the temperatures

And tell the wind when to blow

And when to be still?

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Have a Wonderful Wednesday

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See you tomorrow

Everything Happens for a Reason


A Reason for Everything

I believe everything happens for a reason. Do you?

We may not see the reason at the time, but eventually, if we are perceptive, if we are thoughtful, if we are open to it, the reason will become apparent.

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Synchronicity

I believe in coincidence. Do you?

I think coincidences are God’s synchronicity. In fact, it’s not “coincidence” at all… it’s part of a Master Plan.

Bear with me.

Let me tell you what happened this week while our grandson, Chris, was here in Ennis visiting us – on a ten day leave from the Anaconda Job Corps.

Chris took the leave because his parents (our daughter, DeAna, and her husband André) are here from their home in Switzerland. Chris (who has dual citizenship, by the way) hasn’t seen his parents in six months, so of course he wanted to have this time with them.

We are at the end of the ten days now. The three of them will leave today. De & Andre’ will drive Chris back to the Job Corps. Then they will be on their way to Los Angeles to fly back home to their place in the Alps.

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Meanwhile…

Two days ago we learned that the USA government is reorganizing their Job Corps program AND in the process, they are closing nine training sites across the USA. The Anaconda Job Corps training site is one of nine sites scheduled to deactivate by the end of 2019.

In fact, one news article indicated Anaconda will be closed by the end of August 2019!

Chris is not scheduled to finish his Heavy Equipment mechanics program  until December or January.

Where is the Coincidence?

What does this have to do with synchronicity?

Well, Anaconda Job Corps opened its doors in 1966, the year DeAna was conceived. For 53 years it has trained thousands of young people between the ages of 16 and 24. This particular year when it is scheduled to close –  is the year DeAna’s youngest son is training there.

I believe it is no coincidence that Chris is here at this time – – – and that he was gone when the shocking news was announced. There is a reason. There are reasons. But, we don’t see them yet.

Two days ago we received this e-mail announcement from a friend:
The Chief posted more information on the Job Corps Centers this morning on “Inside the Forest Service”.   Click on – www.fs.fed.us/inside-fs

 

Leadership

Chris has been in Anaconda four months, and has moved rapidly through the ranks to become a leader among the other trainees. His experience there has helped him grow in maturity, self-esteem, and self-confidence. He has gained “alpha” status, and the respect of his fellows.

We are so proud of what he accomplished so far there at Job Corps!

Us w Chris

The experience and the training he has received in Anaconda so far will not be lost.

The announcement of potential closure more than likely was made while Chris was away from the site this week (I can’t imagine with it being in the local newspapers and on-line that it was not a major topic of discussion there). I anticipate that he will return today to a lot of friends who are in turmoil.

He is a level-headed, compassionate young man – – – and he can lend a listening ear, and a voice of reason.

Unknowns

There are so many unknowns.

  • Where and when will the 150+ students be transferred to other sites to finish their training?
  • Do they WANT to transfer to another place? Will some just quit?
  • The Job Corps sites that were contracted out and run by the US Forest Service are being transferred to the Department of Labor (if they are not targetted to close). What will happen to the staff hired by the Forest service?
  • Will their years of service and their retirement plans be honored by the Dept. of Labor?
  • Will they have jobs offered to them at other locations? If they live in Anaconda, will they WANT to transfer to Butte or Darby, Montana or one of the other Job Corps locations?
  • What will happen to the little town of Anaconda? The Job Corps is one of its greatest employers!
  • How does this fit into some Master Plan that will ultimately be beneficial?

Choices

When one door closes, another opens. I have heard that all my life. Have you?

Do you believe it?

Everything happens for a reason.

man holding brown boombox radio

Photo by Nicholas Githiri on Pexels.com


Stay tuned in!

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See you tomorrow

Family and Food


Santé!!

When we are with our family from Switzerland,

Food and wine are the foci of the day.

Preparing for the evening meal

Is our joy-filled version of play.

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We plan and shop and try to see

If we can fix a meal so tasty and bright

That guests must take a picture of it

Before they can eat a single bite.

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My son-in-law is an exquisite chef;

So, cooking a meal for him to eat

Is a summons that I rise to greet.

It’s a challenge that I love to meet.

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I wait to see what André and DeDe say,

And I ask for sage and constructive advice.

Cooking is a hobby, a life-long endeavor,

And having a built-in expert is really nice!

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Here you are, my blogging friends –

Enjoy a look at a few of our latest meals.

Maybe someday you can come to dine

And see how our Montana hospitality feels!

The rack of lamb with polenta and green beans I fixed last night.

André taught me how to fix it next time so all the “lollipops” are more evenly cooked.

The pork roast with mushroom cream sauce and potatoes au gratin and asparagus/sautéed almonds – – – mmmm – – – André fixed earlier this week. It was incredible!

Beef in a plum sauce with asparagus on cheesy potatoes –
garnished with parsley. Too pretty to eat!

DeDe and me happy to be in the kitchen together

Bob and André enjoying a relaxed visit between meals

A wine of choice for a meal out.

Another chef’s version of rack of lamb. Pretty, huh?

André – waiting for a meal in the beautiful area of Jackson Hole, WY

A dessert worth waiting for…

Another meal they had on their way to visit us. Mmmm… it’s called a Fire Roll. I love sushi. It’s my go-to meal when I have a chance to eat out. What is yours?

Loving One Another includes cooking and treating one another with food and hospitality, right? What’s your favorite meal to fix or eat at home?

Today is my TOPS day

(Take off pounds sensibly)

I think I’ll wait til my kids leave before I go back to weigh in.

Don’t you think that’s a good idea?

 

❤️❤️❤️

See you tomorrow

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