Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘writing’

Find Contentment


Paul Holdorf – Singing Sky Photography

Contentment

Paul Holdorf posted the following beautiful, eloquent essay on FaceBook today to accompany his wonderful photograph above. Do yourself a favor and take time to live in the scene with Paul and me for awhile. I am still there… in the arms of love and contentment.

No further comment from JanBeek necessary. Just savor Paul Holdorf’s creativity. ❤

“I can’t help but wonder what life was like for the occupants of this home. One might at first say that life sure is easier now, but is it? To be sure, it was a hard life, but it must be so rewarding to directly benefit from hard work. Very few things had to be purchased. Most things were made from whatever was available. A hard days work did not have to be converted to cash in order to benefit the family. The same soil that had to be scrubbed out from under fingernails, when properly tilled and watered, grew food for the table. It also grew food for the livestock that in turn also provided sustenance for the inhabitants of this home. As I stood there, I could hear the life that once resided here. A chair scraped on the rough wood floor as Dad got up to go make sure all was well outside before darkness settled in. The children helped clear chipped and faded dishes from the table as Mom brought in a pale of water to rinse things off. There was enough light left for several hours of exploration, so soon the distance sounds of laughter blended in with the clanking of dishes and the splash of dirty dishwater being thrown out the open door. Next to the door, in the corner of the room, stood an old broom, patiently waiting to remove the gravelly evidence of an evening well played. Later, after the children were all played out and tucked into a crowded bed, a silhouette could be seen in the warm light of the setting sun. Out in the yard, next to the swing hanging from a tree, a tired but fulfilled couple sat on an old log bench with their arms around each other. She leaned her head on his strong shoulder, and he thankfully leaned his head over hers. They watched the golden light dip behind the distant mountains and spread a blanket of oranges and reds over the high mountain valley much like the bedspread that would soon bring warmth and comfort to this couple. They work hard, they sleep when the sun sleeps and rise with it in the morning but it is a good life. Nothing is wasted, and everything is wisely used. I walk away from my daydream as they drift off to sleep. Stars begin to twinkle and an owl calls from its roost out in the forest. Rest and rejuvenation fill weary bodies with readiness for the next day, when they’ll do it all over again with joy and contentment in lives well lived.”

Was Lost – Is Found


On his blog, RothPoetry, Dwight posted this today,

“Today we were asked to write poetry from our book shelf. Bjorn, at d’Verse, called it found poetry. The challenge is to arrange and make a poem using book titles from our shelf, without changing any titles. I thought these were a very fitting group for the times we are experiencing. See what you think?

Found Poetry

Violence

Money, Sex, and Power

The Brilliant Idiot

Dialogue with death”

So I thought it would be fun to take up the challenge and do my own “Found Poem.”

The bookshelf in my “Angel Room”

I’m OK – You’re OK

Faith is the Answer

Mornings with Jesus

Reach Out!

Go to Dwight’s WordPress blog: see some other Found Poems. Take up the challenge! Go to your bookshelf. Share a Found Poem with me. Have fun with it. I’d love ❤️ to hear from you.

Virtual hugs 🤗

Cheers!! JanBeek

Are You a Writer?


Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

What’s a Writer?

How do you define a writer? Are you one?

Not everyone who reads my blog has a blog of their own. Not everyone who writes a blog has anything published anywhere else.

Must you write a blog or have something published in order to consider yourself a writer?

Does writing in a journal qualify you to call yourself “Writer”?

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

When you create a grocery list or a list of your “To-Do’s” for today, you are writing. Does that make you a “Writer”?

Definition of Writer

noun

  1. a person engaged in writing books, articles, stories, etc., especially as an occupation or profession; an author or journalist.
  2. a clerk, scribe, or the like.
  3. a person who commits his or her thoughts, ideas, etc., to writing
  4. (in a piece of writing) the author (used as a circumlocution for “I,” “me,” “my,” etc.): The writer wishes to state….
  5. a person who writes or is able to writea writer in script.
Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com

The Key to Being a Writer

The key to being a writer lies for me in the definitions number 3 and 5 above. It’s so obvious!

To be a writer, you must write! You must commit your thoughts and ideas to writing! Not just the ability to write (like writing your signature on a check or signing your name on a card), but the ability to put your thoughts and ideas down on paper or computer or someplace where others can read them.

Are you a writer who writes for others?

Play at Writing

Photo by Artem Beliaikin on Pexels.com

Write like a child at play –
words are the beads;
string them together
one bead at a time.

Writing should be fun! Cristian Mihai on The Art of Blogging says, “Just punch the damn keys.” In his post today, he reminds us also that we are never finished in our quest to be anything… writers, artists, body builders, you name it!

His blog is about Art
inspiration
motivation
passion
Personal Development

Cristian Mihai wrote in the blog I imbedded above (for your ease in going to read it in its entirety),
“… we are all works of art. And we are never, ever, ever complete.”

He quoted 70 year-old Seneca who wrote,

“I am still learning…”

Cristian went on to remind us,

“One thing of extreme importance in life is never, ever to be complete.

To always strive for more.

To be able to reinvent yourself on a constant basis.”

He said, “We are not nouns, but verbs. Action is what defines us. And we can change what we do as we learn and develop new skills.”

I appreciate the ideas I glean on a daily basis from Cristian Mihai. He helps me put into action some of my better impulses, and to do it with the Spirit guiding me.

Let the Spirit Guide Your Writing

Let intentionality
yield to spontaneity.
Let the spirit
guide you.

Spiritual direction is as important to the life of a writer as good editing is to the life of the mind. Both deliver us from the blindness of a solitary thinker.

Being a solitary writer squeezes our vision and makes us myopic. Being short-sighted cuts us off from the wonderful world of criticism. Your spirit can guide your creativity, but seeking one’s own center does not mean we should discount others’ opinions.

Writers Are Not Indifferent

In his book, Saints and Writers – On Doing One’s Work in Hiding, Belden C. Lane wrote the following about prolific writer, James Joyce:

“James Joyces’ wife, Nora, loved him for his ordinariness. She paid little attention to his writing. With critics, Joyce had to second-guess himself. With Nora, he never had to prove anything. It was worthless even to try. Loving indifference can prove a safe place – a hidden center – from which one’s creativity grows without being turned back onto itself.”

I am not indifferent to the responses of others to my writing. Unlike James Joyce, who evidently came across as “ordinary” to his wife, my husband treats me like I am anything but ordinary – a very special, talented writer whose ideas are worth reading. He reads each of my blogs before I post them. I am not indifferent to his editorial ideas, and I appreciate his input.

Photo by Ann H on Pexels.com

Let Your Creativity Grow

Just as Cristian Mihai reminded us in his blog today, never ever be complete! Never consider your skill set as mastered. Always keep learning and growing and seeking ways to improve.

You ARE a writer! You DO commit your thoughts and ideas to writing.

A few of your ideas expressed in the comments below will not be met with indifference by this writer. I LOVE hearing from you. You help me to keep growing!

See you tomorrow.

Passing the Torch — Big Sky Buckeye


My blogging friend, Richard, posted this wonderful poem this morning. Since both my grandpas died before I was born, I did not get to meet either of them. So, watching my hubby be a loving Grampy to our 7 grandkids has been a real treasure. Richard captured that Grandpa feeling beautifully in his post today. I am delighted to share it with you:

Watching a quiet Saturday sunrise Feeling grateful, thankful to be alive Being retired, life moves at a slower pace Realizing, there’s no need to win the race Remembering grandfathers, crisp and clear Teaching life lessons, steady and sincere Growing up, learning from their example Tasting life with every new sample Loving […]

Passing the Torch — Big Sky Buckeye

Four Ways To Overcome Fear


Sometimes this COVID-19 feels like we’re walking through the “Valley of the Shadow of Death,” especially when we see the staggering statistics from Italy and realize how quickly the virus is spreading in places like New York City.

A friend told me today he feels we’re living in a period akin to the Great Depression or the Dust Bowl era. Songs are being composed about it. There are thoughtful essays being written. Scientists are creating impressive graphs showing the statistics of known contagions to death tolls and analyzing the relationships to age and climate. Novels will be written that will be classics in the decades to come.

How do we live through this “Valley of the Shadow of Death” without fear?

There are the usual responses: pray, sequester and meditate, have faith, bury your head…

But, while I do believe in the power of our Maker, and I pray daily for the Source of all comfort to bring us healing and peace, there are a few other ways I keep myself FROM feeling the gloom that seems to be enveloping so many. You probably have a list of ways, too. I’d love to have you share yours with me.

Here are my four favorite remedies for avoiding the paralysis of fear:

  • Music – sing, play, or listen to uplifting songs on YouTube or XM Radio. I love seeing those folks on their balconies in Italy making joyful music together, don’t you? I just listened to Bono and Will.i.am singing a song they wrote for/to the Italians. Google it! Music soothes the soul and uplifts the spirit.
  • Write – as a blogger, you know how therapeutic it is to put words on paper, in a journal, on a card to a friend, or here on WordPress. Write about what keeps you positive and passionate.
  • Connect – on the internet or by phone, through a window or across a fence. I just installed a new app on my phone and iPad. It’s called ZOOM. Do you know it? The basic version is free. It’s like FaceTime, but it works on other platforms besides Apple products. My friends in California and Bob & I had a great conversation. It was like sitting across the table from our friends who are 1200 miles away from us. We miss them and it lifted our spirits to see and reconnect with them.
  • Walk – when the weather permits, go for a walk with your dog or a friend or both. I did that yesterday in our Lion’s Club Park. Yes, we practiced social distancing, but we could chat and laugh and encourage one another. It’s good for body and soul. And TazE loved it, too.

Do tell your dog he’s gotta walk, too!

Tell me, what ways do you avoid walking in the “Valley of the Shadow of Death” these days?

What are your favorite ways of avoiding fear?

Thanks for dropping by.
Visit a while, okay?
Add your ideas below.
See ya tomorrow.

Write a Tanka


Photo by Talha R on Pexels.com

How do you write tanka?

The basic structure of a tanka poem is 5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7. In other words, there are 5 syllables in line 1, 7 syllables in line 2, 5 syllables in line 3, and 7 syllables in lines 4 and 5.

The Tanka poem is very similar to haiku but Tanka poems have more syllables and it uses simile, metaphor and personification.

Ah, so it’s not just the syllable count that matters. The subject matter has to involve simile, metaphor and personification. Raise the stakes!!

What are Simile, Metaphor and Personification?

  • Simile = Both similes and metaphors are forms of comparison that compare words in a sentence. They can be used to make your sentences more interesting. How are similes and metaphors different? A simile is a word that compares words in a sentence. You can usually tell if a simile is present in a sentence when you see the words as or like. Don ate his salad like a vacuum cleaner. His arms were weak and felt like noodles. The thunder was as loud as fireworks.
  • Metaphor = Like a simile, a metaphor compares words in a sentence; however, instead of saying that one thing is like something else, a metaphor actually makes one thing become something very different by renaming it. A metaphor can sometimes use words like is, are, or was (and other words) to signal that a metaphor is present. However, a metaphor never uses the words like or as to compare. The smoke was cotton balls billowing from the chimney. You are my hero. The sun was a furnace.
  • Personification = Personification is the act of giving non-living things human characteristics. Here is a sample of a short paragraph that uses personification to describe a house:

    Our house is an old friend of ours. Although he creeks and groans with every gust of wind, he never fails to protect us from the elements. He wraps his arms of weathered wood around us and keeps us safe. He’s always been a good friend to us and we would never leave him.
Photo by mali maeder on Pexels.com

Which of those three does my Tanka below employ?

Jesus is a tree

Whose trunk is strong and stable

From it, we branches

Grow out of His love and care

And we bear His compassion

Is it a simile, a metaphor or personification?

Try a Tanka of your own. And have a Terrific Tuesday!

See ya later.

Words Can Be Such Fun!


 BEAUTY PARLOR   
A place where women curl up and dye. 

Photo by Valeria Boltneva on Pexels.com


CHICKENS   
The only animal you eat before they are born and after they are dead. 

    
COMMITTEE   
A body that keeps minutes and wastes hours. 

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com


DUST   
Mud with the juice squeezed out. 

Photo by Daniel on Pexels.com


EGOTIST   
Someone who is usually me-deep in conversation. 

    
HANDKERCHIEF   
Cold storage.     

INFLATION   
Cutting money in half without damaging the paper.   

MOSQUITO 
An insect that makes you like flies better.  

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 
POLITICAL CORRECTNESS
A doctrine fostered by a delusional,  illogical minority.    

RAISIN   
A grape with a sunburn.     

SECRET   
A story you tell to one person at a time.  

SKELETON   
A bunch of bones with the person scraped off.  

Photo by Chris J Mitchell on Pexels.com


TOOTHACHE
A pain that drives you to extraction. 

TOMORROW       
One of the greatest labor-saving devices of today. 

YAWN   
An honest opinion openly expressed.     

WRINKLES   
Something other people have … similar to my character lines.  

Hah!!

 OLD
I very quietly confided to my friend that I was having an affair.
She turned to me and asked, “Are you having it catered?”
… and that, my friend, is the definition of ‘OLD’!

And just in case you wondered,
NO, by the way, I am not OLD!
80 is the new 40…
Didn’t anybody tell you??

Think young!

Have fun with words and ideas.
See ya tomorrow!

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