Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘Father’

How Gratitude Changes Lives


Gratitude Haiku x4

Live with Gratitude.
Gratefulness changes your life –
Notice little things.

Fill a daily post
In your gratitude journal;
It’s very potent!

Commit to refrain
From complaining or gossip
Or criticism.

Let your decision
To live always gratefully
Enhance every day.

What or who are you grateful for today?
It’s a great habit to repeat those thank you’s!!
See ya later.

He Left Us


He Left Us

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Happy Father’s Day!

I wrote this poem in honor of my dear Dad, Sal DeAngeles, shortly after he  died in April of 1995. I thought this was a good time to pull it out and share it with you, my dear blog readers. I hope you have equally vivid and happy memories of your Father. You can get a pretty good picture of who my daddy was by seeing what he left us… and the things he left behind.

He Left Us

He left us his roses and hydrangeas,
and his garden with zucchini,
but he forgot to take the old wheelbarrow,
and he forgot to take the bocci ball court.
.
He left his mother’s crucifix on my wall,
his watch in the top dresser drawer,
the Balsamic vinegar in the cupboard,
and his love of ravioli and French bread,
but he forgot to take his Gallo Burgundy.
.
He left in each of us his love of family,
his teary-eyed sentimentality, and he left
the aches and pains of his earthly body,
but he forgot to take his spray paint, and
his love of convertibles with the top down.
.
He left the wife he loved so well,
the family and neighbors who miss him so,
and the unconditional love, but he
forgot his collection of nude calendars,
and he forgot to take his twinkle.
I know – I have it!

 

If your dad has left this earth, try writing a poem about what he left and what he forgot to take. Have fun with it!

Happy Sunday.
Happy Father’s Day!

heart of love

See you with my sermon notes after church.
God bless you!

 

 

The Forgiving Father


Happy Sunday, my friends. Did you attend church today?

We did – and I took my usual sermon notes in poetry.
And we sang a great version of the scripture lesson.
I share it with you below.

classic close up draw expensive

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

The scripture the sermon was based on was Luke 15:1-32.

It is a familiar passage for most Christians.
It includes the parables of three things LOST: a Sheep, a Coin, and a Son.

The song we sang  after the sermon was a beautiful poetic summary of the scripture.
The words, written in 1999 by Carolyn Winfrey Gillette are so “right on!”
I HAVE to share them with you.
.
As you read these lyrics, try singing them to the tune of “What a Friend We Have in Jesus.” It’s magical! It’s gorgeous!!

.
God’s Great Love is So Amazing

 

Verse 1

God’s great love is so amazing!
See a shepherd with his flocks!
Ninety-nine are safely grazing;
One is lost among the rocks.

That good shepherd goes and searches
Till he finds the one astray.
So God says to fill our churches
With the ones who’ve lost their way.

Verse 2

God in love is always seeking!
See a woman with her broom!
For a single coin she’s sweeping
Every corner of the room.

When it’s found she calls each neighbor,
Telling friends from all around.
So God says to search and labor
Till God’s precious ones are found.

Verse 3

God keeps waiting, searching, yearning!
See a father’s heartfelt joy!
Thankful for the son’s returning.
He runs out to greet his boy.

To the angry older brother,
Hear the father’s patient call.
So God says to love each other,
For in Christ, God loves us all.

man holding boy

 

My sermon notes are not as professional as the poem above.
They lack the a-b-a-b rhyme scheme.
Mine is based on an a-b-c-b scheme.
You probably can’t sing them to a chosen tune.
But they capture the message I heard being preached.
See if you can relate to how our pastor took this scripture
and spun it into a lesson for us all.

The Forgiving Father

Sermon notes 3/31/19
Jan Beekman’s “take-away” on
Rev. Jean Johnson’s message
Madison Valley Presbyterian Church
Ennis, Montana

 

Leave ninety-nine vulnerable
For the sake of finding one?
The Lost Sheep story tells us
That’s exactly what Jesus woulda done.

 

Leave a pocketful of change
For the one coin lost?
Yes, that’s what Jesus said.
Look carefully at the cost!

 

The cost of losing valued
Possessions can be very high.
We leave behind the flock
And fly off to pie in the sky!

 

Open your eyes to the One
Who is right in your midst.
The Shepherd among us
Seeks the lost. He insists.

 

The least among us are
Lost until they’re found.
We’re to be the seekers
Who search, listening for the sound.

 

Listen for the lost sheep’s plea,
And know, in fact, we are they.
We all need to be rescued
From the flighty life we live today.

 

Jesus really spoke not of
Coins and sheep, but us.
We are the ones who need
To be found. We must!

 

We must seek and be found
By Christ who loved us first.
Let’s join His rescued sheep
And rejoice as He quenches our thirst.

 

Christ shows us God’s real joy
With the parable of father and son.
The wayward boy returned home.
He was lost, now found. Victory won!

Welcome Home!
Come join the party.

Amen?

Tell me about the message at your church or temple or synagogue today.
What was your take-away?

 

 

Dogwood


Day 4 of the A-Z activity of “What Makes Me Happy.”

Little did I realize when I chose Dogwood for my D word what I would learn about this beautiful tree (now a large bush)!

Dogwood and Daddy are in the same pocket of my heart. This picture of my daddy was taken under the dogwood tree in my brother-in-law’s back yard in central California about two and a half decades ago. I treasure it because it captures my father’s sweet disposition and kindness so perfectly. That tree is not gnarled and twisted as the Legend of the Dogwood tree suggests. But the blossoms are as the legend describes in this poem I found on the Internet this morning:

I didn’t know this legend until now. How did I miss it all these years? Did you know it?

What’s the D word that makes YOU happy?

Memories of Daddy


 

image

Gentle, kind, considerate

These words describe my dad

Unconditionally loving

Always made me glad.

 

Everyone should be blessed

With a father such as mine

His faults were few and far between

Except when time to dine.

 

He burnt the the chicken to a crisp,

But he loved to barbecue

Steaks or hotdogs, ribs and such

Were treats he’d cook for you.

 

His favorite place was in a car

Driving to The City or Yosemite,

But when we arrived, he’d hate to stop

Even when I’d beg, “I have to pee!”

 

I’d ask him for help with my math

But he would always say,

”Go ask your mom, I don’t know –

I missed the lesson in school that day!”

 

He rarely darkened a church’s door

Unless a wedding or funeral required.

He said he had to work on Sundays

Or else, “Surely, you know, I’d be fired!”

 

Hah, that’s hardly possible, dear Dad,

You own the business; you’re the boss.

But even though we pleaded hard,

He’d never go. So much our loss!

 

A more endearing, Christ-like man

You’d never hope to meet.

He never spoke an unkind word,

And every stranger he was first to greet.

 

An alter boy when he was young,

He learned his Catechism well.

Church or not, as an adult,

He sparkled an angelic spell.

 

My dad was more than I could ask.

He loved me through and through.

Dad, I wish every girl and boy

Could have a Daddy just like you!

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