Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘marriage’

Songs, Smiles & Stability


Songs, Smiles & Stability

 

woman playing ukulele

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Thanks for joining me on our A-Z journey
to find ways to
Add More Meaning
and
Discover Clearer Purpose
in Life

Today’s letter
is “S”

affection baby barefoot blur

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Songs

Yesterday my second great-grandchild was born. My grandson, Jordan, and his “significant other” Joss, live in Sacramento. The care Joss received was wonderful at the hospital when she arrived by ambulance to deliver a little girl one month prematurely. By the grace of God, all that baby girl’s fingers and toes are perfect and at last report, she was nursing and cooing. No smiles yet, but those will come. Meantime, I am singing praises to God, the Creator for this little treasure.

https://deyspublishing.wordpress.com/2019/05/10/bring-forth/
The link above will take you to my friend, Dorothy’s blog.
Her topic today, “Bring Forth” fits today’s “S” themes perfectly…
Thank you, Dorothy!

Sing to the Lord
is one of my favorites.
I can get it here with my Amazon Music.
Can you? Try clicking on it and look for
Faithful Servant album by the Herbster Trio

(But don’t forget to come back.. there’s more good stuff here!)

https://music.amazon.com/albums/
Hallelujah!

Smiles

I am smiling as I sit here this afternoon volunteering at our Madison Valley Medical Center in Ennis, Montana. The smiles are a result of my anticipated hug time with Cosette, my new great-granddaughter, named after a main character in Les Miserables.

Another thought that brings smiles is the party we are planning at our house tomorrow for my Ennis granddaughter’s 25th birthday and our great-grandson’s 2nd birthday.

I am also smiling because I am reading a small booklet that I received in the mail today from Red Cloud Indian School in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The booklet, titled Whispers of the Lakota, is filled with poetry written by 9th and 10th graders. I am soooo impressed with the depth of these poems. I called the school and asked for permission to share a couple of them with you. They agreed.

This one is by Isabelle, a 10th grader,

THE HERO IN ME

“She smiles, she laughs, she hurts,
…     she cries.
She holds it all inside.
She lives, she flies, she soars,
She dies.
She is the one I idolize.
She loves, she gives, she cares,
She is
The one I know I will someday
…     Be
A hero, a mother, a child, a soul,
…      the woman inside of me.”

Such a perfect poem for this Mother’s Day weekend, don’t you think?
Thank you, Isabelle, for letting me share it. I love it!

Kudos to your 9th and 10th grade English teacher who drew these marvelously thoughtful, intimate poems out of his-her students’ hearts!

Stability

My prayer for Cosette, my new great-granddaughter, born prematurely to this couple who have not yet yielded to the commitment of marriage, is that she will grow in an atmosphere of unconditional love, a home where her best interests are in her parents’ vision, and a family who will give her joy, nourishment, and stability.

On this topic, let me share another poem from  Whispers of the Lakota  by a 10th grader named Jessie:

LIFE

“We often call it a gift, a mystery.
We have the power to make and take.
Let’s think about this
I know we can all relate
A brand new human, bright-eyed to the world
We cannot tell time, we cannot tell where or when
Something will happen but we can see that brand new
Baby Boy or Baby Girl
Life is a treasure, a gift not to be destroyed
You cannot throw a child away as if it were a toy.
The actions you take can certainly make or break
Take the time to consider the life
You make.

What amazing insight for a 10th grader to exhibit, huh?  What might Jessie have seen in his/her young life to have been able to write so poignantly from the heart – the soul – of the human spirit?

If the poem is from Jessie’s experience, then we might assume Jessie has seen life taken for granted – and has experienced (or known up close about) the unspeakable act of the “throw-away child.” A life destroyed. How sad! Thank you, Jessie, for encouraging and believing in the right to life for these defenseless little treasures.

More Meaning/ Clearer Purpose

This blog series, devoted to adding more meaning and discovering clearer purpose
in life, could not have been enhanced more than by the words of these young people.  Thank you, Red Cloud Indian School, for the work you do with these Lakota students! The way you love them and teach them and help them learn is so appreciated!

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Red Cloud Indian School provides stability of place, stability of community, and stability of heart to children who need all of those so much. It is the largest privately funded Indian School in the USA, educating more than 600 students on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in a remote part of South Dakota since 1888. They teach the children not to run away from challenges and difficulties, but to stay and work through problems. They educate and nurture them. God bless the school and their students and staff!

Songs, Smiles and Stability

I hope today’s message has lived up to its promise to put a song of praise and thanksgiving in your hearts, give you reasons to smile, and has given you pause – as you think of the person(s) in your life who provided you with a sense of stability.

Happy Mother’s Day weekend!

See you tomorrow!

 

Mom Was an Okie


Let me take a break this Mother’s Day weekend from my A-Z series and talk instead about moms. Okay?

How would you describe your mom?

My mom was an Okie.

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Hmmm… How dare I?!

How dare I use such a derogatory term! “Okie” was a term used by those who thought they were better than those Dust Bowl transplants who moved to the west coast from Oklahoma to find a way to make a living when years of drought forced them from their homes there.

The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck is a classic book that told the story of Tom Joad, the father of a migrant family. Tom left the Oklahoma dust bowl for promised land in California, only to face new and daunting challenges. It was made into an award-winning movie starring Henry Fonda.

Wrong Assumption

My father’s sisters erroneously decided Mom was a west-coast migrant from Oklahoma. Unlike those Dust Bowl transplants from Oklahoma, my mother, Elizabeth Totten, had ancestors who migrated in the late 1800s from Ireland and Scotland to Iowa and then to the state of Washington at the turn of the century. Mom’s family owned a farm in Fall City, Washington. Her dad died when she was in her early teens. My grandmother guided her six children to work hard to keep the farm operating without my grandpa to lead the way.

After Elizabeth graduated from high school in 1933, she worked in Fall City at a creamery to help the family survive and retain the farm. She moved to California after she met my dad, Sal DeAngeles, a handsome, suave, dark-haired young man, 4 years her senior.

Early Days in Mom’ & Dad’s Marriage

Elizabeth and Sal eloped to Reno, NV in 1937 and kept their marriage a secret for awhile. They were aware that his family might have trouble accepting her.

Many times Mom told me the story of how Dad’s Italian sisters (he had 5 of ’em) were resentful of her intrusion. She said they called her an Okie. (To her face? I hope not!) She was not Italian. And worse yet, she was not Catholic! And to add insult to injury, Dad’s mother (my Grandma DeAngeles) loved Mom as if she were one of her own daughters. There may have been some jealousy at work there.

Mom thought Dad’s sisters had a friend, a local Italian, Catholic girl picked out for their brother. Mom said she believed they were shocked and rather put-off by his decision to marry this outsider.

Whether her perception of their non-acceptance was true or not, it colored our family’s relationship with my dear aunts forever! It may have been one of the reasons I recall our family going on Sunday afternoons to visit Dad’s sisters at their homes, but rarely inviting them to come to ours. What a shame!

Who was Mom – – – really?

Elizabeth (later nick-named Betty) was the fourth in a family of five children born to Laura & Ralph Valentine (RV) Totten. She was a slightly built, blond, blue-eyed girl with three older sisters, one brother, and a younger sister. She adored her father, whose untimely death (he fell off a barn roof and died of a brain injury), left her devastated.

She was a good student, particularly talented as an “elocutionist” (public speaker), and would have loved to attend college. Financially it just was not an option. She was good at math as well, and eventually became Dad’s secretary/treasurer in his business. In her retirement years, she kept herself busy playing Bridge and participating in the women’s organizations of Eastern Star and Rebekahs.

What do I Remember Fondly About My Mom?

Mom always told me I could do and be whomever I decided I wanted to be. She believed in me. She gave me confidence, and encouraged all my various endeavors. She made sure I got accordion lessons when I showed an interest in that instrument. She helped me get a clarinet when I wanted to join the elementary school band, and she drove me to weekly accordion and clarinet lessons fifty miles away.

Mom helped me develop my writing skills and encouraged my ventures into art and school leadership. She convinced Dad that I should be able to go to college – and made sure they managed to finance my college expenses so that I could concentrate on my studies. “Your school work is your job,” she explained when I was contemplating a job to help with college costs. Unlike most college students today, I graduated with a BA of education in four years – and was debt free. What a gift!

Mirror Images

Mom’s spit-fire personality sometimes caused us to be at odds with one another. I see her in me now and blame her for all the parts of my personality that annoy me. I look in the mirror and see her arms hanging from my shoulders (when did that happen?). I see her impatience in me when I am being less than kind. I look up and shake my finger at her when i am too outspoken.

Thank You, Mom

But at the same time, I thank my mom for all the ways she helped me become the  “Child of God” I am today. She made sure my sister, Sally, and I got to church each Sunday. She was 100% honest and she taught Sally and me to be morally responsible, dependable, hard-working young ladies. I am grateful to my mom for her role modeling, her work ethic, and her unconditional love.

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Family is So Precious!

The picture below is 53 years old!! That’s me on the left, pregnant with our first child. My husband, Bob, is standing next to me. Next is my sister, Sally, with her husband, Dave, holding their eldest daughter, Denise (both of whom are now deceased). I thank God every day for life – and for the life of my children – and count my blessings that they are alive and healthy, productive adults today. I never take that for granted.

My mom and dad (Sal & Betty) are in the foreground. The best gift they gave to me was their love for one another – and their love for our family.

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Happy Mother’s Day
to all those wonderful moms out there
who have impacted their children
in such important ways –
and continue to do so everyday…
some up close and personal,
and others as they lean over the
Heavenly railings and watch over us from above.
***

What do you remember most about your Mom?
And what do you want to thank her for?

 

13 Ways to Say, “I Love You”


Nothing beats those three little words,
“I Love You!”

But, some folks just have a hard time saying it.
Listen for these other expressions!

I love u-13 ways

Thanks to http://www.IntelligenceForYourLife.com for sharing these!

Which one has your loved one used to tell YOU,
“I love you?”

Bob often stops at the CostCo flower counter
and picks out a lovely bouquet to bring home
when we are out shopping.

Sometimes I order flowers from FTD
to be delivered with a love note from me to him.
A single rose will do!

selective focus photo of red rose

Photo by Hassan OUAJBIR on Pexels.com

 

Is there one you can add to the list?

I would add,
“Welcome home, Sweetheart! Dinner’s ready!”

beef-string beans

Is there one that reminded you of a favorite way
you express your love?

Signs of Affection (Haiku x4)


Signs of Affection
Are in life’s every corner
Just know where to look

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Signs that you are loved
Are everywhere your heart is
Open to be seen

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Expose your heart’s core
To vulnerability
Your reward is there

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Congratulations
To Faith & Kyle’s engagement
Love’s new beginning

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When’ s the date, dear granddaughter??

 

midsection of woman making heart shape with hands

 

 

Sharing Multiplies Joy – Haiku x7


Sharing special days

Like our anniversary

Makes them more special

Inviting good friends

To celebrate days with us

Increases friendship

Generously share

Days of sweet significance

Multiply your joy

Share a lovely meal

Happy Birthday, dear friend, at

Sacajawea!

.

First picture up there

Was seven short years ago

Here’s fifty-seven!

Wonderful wedding

Beautiful cake and event

My how the time flies!!

Have we changed a lot?

Inside we are still the same

Keeping love alive!

.

Tell me about some sharing you’ve done that multiplied your joy!

Lucky In-Loves


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We are very blessed
To love our son’s dear in-laws;
They are our in-loves!

What is Love?


white and pink floral freestanding letter decor

Photo by rovenimages.com on Pexels.com

What do we mean when we say, “I love you?”

affection afterglow backlit blur

Photo by luizclas on Pexels.com

Is it the same as “Love One Another” (my blog sub-heading)?

four person standing at top of grassy mountain

Photo by Helena Lopes on Pexels.com

Is it the same as “I love ice cream”?

vanila sundae with choco on top

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

In a discussion with my 23-year-old grandson about our cultural use of the word LOVE in the English language, I shared with him that we do ourselves a disservice by having only one word for love. In the Ancient Greek culture, there are six words for love.

“What are they?” Chris asked.

Of course, I couldn’t come up with them from the top of my head, so I went to the web and googled it. From “YesMagazine” on-line – Building a Better World – I found my answer in an article titled, Ideas on the Definition of LOVE from the Greek perspective.

You may already know all this, but maybe, like me, you can’t pop the answer up from your vast memory bank. Here’s a refresher… and a reminder of the types of love our world sorely lacks today (my biased opinion there, of course).

Passionate Love

Eros  – sexual passion; named after the Greek god of fertility. It represented the idea of sexual passion and desire.

Comradely Friendship

Philia  – deep friendship; valued far more by the Greeks than the base sexuality of eros. Philia developed between brothers in arms who fought side-by-side on the battlefield. It is about showing loyalty for your friends, sacrificing for them, as well as freely sharing your emotions with them.

Playful Love

Ludus  – playful love; it’s the playful affection between children, the flirting and teasing of teens and young adults, the bantering and laughing of friends socializing or out dancing.

Selfless Love

Agape   – love for everyone; selfless love, extended to all people, whether family members or distant strangers. Agape was translated into Latin as “caritas” from which our word charity was derived.

Long-standing Love

Pragma  – long-standing love; mature, realistic love that is commonly found among long-established couples. Pragma is about making compromises to help the relationship work over time, showing patience and tolerance.

Self-Love

Philautia  -love of self;  not excessive self-love in the unhealthy form of narcissism, but the healthy version enhanced by a wider capacity to love. If you like yourself and feel secure in yourself, you will have plenty of love to give others.

And which of those types of love
do you think we need to expand
most in our world today?

I would say both AGAPE and PRAGMA.

Out of those loves true fellowship can grow and thrive.

Image may contain: 6 people, including Jeannine Arndt, people smiling

Here are five of my high school buddies. How I wish I could have been in fellowship with them when this photo was taken. I PRAGMA these guys!!

Today is the first day of Advent. It is the Christian weeks of waiting. Waiting for the promised Messiah. Waiting for Christ’s Mass – Christmas, the birth of our Savior. During Advent we are reminded to become more quiet. “Be still and know that I am God.”

Cherish your loves, your friends, your fellowship with others, and give of your heart to those in need. Prepare for the coming of God’s Son. Prepare by living your best Agape and Pragma self! Be in fellowship with other Christians and with those who need these attributes Rick Warren lists below. Be with others who are seeking and waiting, learning and growing.

According to Rick Warren in his book, The Purpose Driven Life, “Genuine fellowship includes authenticity, mutuality, sympathy, mercy, honesty, humility, courtesy, confidentiality, and frequency.” (Page 151)

 

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