Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘bees’

Tuesday’s Bee Poetry


It’s Tuesday Haiku:
Tuesday’s Bee accompanies
My Morning Coffee

And here is Tuesday’s Acrostic:

And I love you, too!

Join me this morning
For an autumn cup of love
From me just for you

Photo by Valeriia Miller on Pexels.com

Have a Terrific Tuesday.

See ya tomorrow.

Bees and Honey


Bees and Honey

You all know I love honey,
And bees are dear to my heart.
How can we protect these pollinators?
Where do we even start?

Honey Jars - Michelle.jpg


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Bee Thanks.jpg

We begin with our children
As we teach them the value of bees.
We show them how to protect
The insects around us – such as these.
.

We show them up close pictures
And let our fascination spread
To the next generation
As we substitute awe for dread.

Bee - carrying pollen.jpg

There’s so much we can learn from these
Social insects who do so much good.
Let’s open our minds and our wonder
To help others do what they should.
.
Enjoy God’s nectar, the honey,
And thank the producers, the bees.
Let’s do all we can to protect them…
There are no more important life form than these!

bee-die-all-die

It’s a message worth teaching
It’s a message worth preaching.
Do your part!

Thanks for visiting…
Have a great first week of Autumn.

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Love, JanBeek

See ya tomorrow.

Gotta Love Bees!


Gotta Love Honeybees

My husband, Bob, is a retired beekeeper. During the 25+ years that he worked with honeybees, he had as many as 2000 hives. I have a passion about saving these insects. It’s about saving our world!

Have you hugged a honeybee today?

Gotta love those little insects –
The fuzzy little gals who sting.
They are essential to us, you know.
Important all year, not just in spring.

No, I don’t recommend you hug ’em.
They wouldn’t like it any more than you.
But, I do recommend you protect them.
Just think of all that they do.

Producing honey is not all they do!

While the honeybee is out working
To gather nectar and return to her hive,
She is pollinating the flowers
To produce the food that keeps us alive.

Just look at those pollen packs!!

One out of every three bites of our food
Is related to the work of the bees.
As they move from flower to flower,
They pollinate ground crops and trees.

Entomophily is the scientific name
Of the pollination activity.
It is crucial to the production
Of many crops and their proclivity.

Celery, strawberries, beets and mustard,
Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and such
All rely on the honeybee for pollination.
Without their work, we wouldn’t have much.

Turnips and peppers, papaya and watermelon,
Oranges, coriander, cantaloupe, apples for you.
Squash and pumpkins, zucchini and quince,
Lemons, limes, and most fruit you love, too.

Alfalfa needs bees, and avocados do, too.
Lima beans, string beans and green beans,
Almonds and most of the nuts we eat…
I could go on, but you get what it means
To have honeybees in our world.
You can see why protection’s a must.
So, get the word out to love those bees!
They are essential to life; of that you can trust!

Get the word out!

Honeybees don’t want to sting you.
They have barbs on their stingers, you know;
So when they sting to protect themselves or their hive,
Their stinger stays in you – and they die. Oh no!

Don’t pinch the stinger out of your skin;
Just scrape it with your fingernail.
Get it out quickly so less poison goes in you,
And put ice on the spot. Don’t whimper and wail!

Bees create honey for their food

Bees are social insects who gather together
To divide up the work in hive and in field.
They create the honey for their own food,
And use the pollen like bread. Quite a yield!

A beehive is sterile – more clean than a hospital.
The bees line their entrance with propolis.
It sterilizes their feet when they cross the threshold.
They have a lot of tricks that would be good for us!

What flower would you want to bee?

You gotta love those honeybees!
They are essential to our life on earth.
If we don’t protect them and do the research,
Our lives here won’t have much worth!

The End!

Thank you, Roth Poetry,
for writing about our bees on your post!
It would be great if all my readers
would share this post with your friends.
Get the word out!
Gotta Love Those Honeybees!

See ya later, Honey!

Love Our Bees!


Love Our Bees!

 

Bee Thanks.jpg

Honeybees give us
One out of every three foods –
Directly or indirectly.
Their pollination is essential.
Their honey is a pure food.
If you avoid adding water to it,
It will be good and nutritious
forever!

blur close up flowing focus

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Don’t refrigerate it!
That speeds up any tendency to crystallize.

Honey was found in
King Tut’s tomb…
And it still was good.
Honeybees are in peril.
Worldwide they are dying
of Colony Collapse Disorder.
Save our bees!

bee perched on white petaled flower closeup photography

And, go hug a Beekeeper!!

three people in white suit

Photo by Arthur Brognoli on Pexels.com

Thanks for beeing here.

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See ya tomorrow.

Bees, Trees, and Water


Bees, Trees and Water

bees trees water

Bees, Trees and Water
Without them we would all die
Preserve them with care

 

All God’s Creation

“Loving One Another” is not just about loving people; it is about loving and caring for all of God’s creation. The plants and animals, and all of nature cry for our attention.

How do you show your love for God’s creatures?

Gotta Love Those Beekeepers!

My husband, Bob, is a retired beekeeper. But, like I say about teachers, “Once a teacher, always a teacher,” well, that’s the case with beekeepers as well.

Beekeepers may sell their hives, trucks, and forklifts, and retire from the work, but the spirit of the hive stays with them forever! We moved from California to Montana and took no hives with us. But there are bee hobbyists right here in Ennis – and it didn’t take long for Bob to find them. He was drawn to them the way a bee is drawn to a nectar source!

animal bee bloom blooming

And, as you know, honeybees have been in the news a lot lately. Bees world-wide are in peril. It’s called CCD = Colony Collapse Disorder. Researchers are busy trying to figure out why whole colonies are dying and beekeepers are losing sometimes up to 1/3 of their hives.

Great Interest in Veteran Beekeepers’ Knowledge

The hobbyist beekeepers, many of whom are new to the scene, appreciate the expertise of veteran beekeepers. Bob was more than happy to lend a hand and get himself back into the groove that was a part of his childhood and a huge portion of his working life.

Jana Bounds, a reporter with the Lone Peak Lookout, was asked to do an article in a local magazine titled, “The Loop.” She contacted Bob and interviewed him. He took her to the site of a local hobbyist beekeeper and spent time describing the situation.

What’s the Problem?

In a nutshell, (or honeybee cell, as the case may be), the problem of disappearing bees is complex, multi-faceted, and not easily labeled. In her article, Jana Bounds quotes my husband, Bob Beekman, as well as Alex McMenamin, PhD student at Montana State University. Both agree, factors like inadequate nutrition, habitat loss, agrochemical exposure, and pathogens are cause for high bee losses.

But, the greatest threat is the Varroa mite. They suck the blood of the larva and spread disease among the bees in the hive. Scientists continue to research, looking for solutions.

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Check out “The Loop” Summer edition, 2019, pages 36 to 39.
It is published by our local Madison County newspaper, The Madisonian.

What Can We Do?

Not many of us are retired beekeepers who can help with hands-on experience. But, we can read and learn, and do our part to help lend support to our beekeepers.

  • Buy local honey
  • Plant flowers and trees that provide good nectar and pollen sources
  • Bees need to be near a water source – keep water pure – don’t pollute
  • Teach children about the value of honeybees (one in every three bites of food we eat is directly or indirectly dependent on bees and their gift of pollination)
  • Avoid use of harmful pesticides
  • Support bee-friendly legislation and research

Beekeepers never die – they just lose their stingers!
Hah! 😉

This is Bob in his younger, beekeeper days:

resendizbob

Bee Well – Bee Happy – Bee Sweet – Eat Honey!!

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See ya tomorrow

 

 

Bee Wise (Haiku x4)


Bee Wise

 

bee bumblebee insect macro

Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Bee wise and gentle
Try to bee reasonable
Live your destiny

animal bees bloom blooming

Photo by Michael Hodgins on Pexels.com

Love one another
And pray for those who hurt you
Live with intention

purple flowers in bloom

Photo by Simon Matzinger on Pexels.com

Just live your best life
Characterized by your faith
Bee the real you

Love and get along
Like bees in community
Spread wisdom’s honey!

honey bee s

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

       … “Real wisdom, God’s wisdom, begins with a holy life
and is characterized by getting along with others.
It is gentle and reasonable.”

James 3:17 (MSG)

Bee a Giver


Bee a Giver

 

bee close up insect little


I’m here to bee a giver,
Sharing the nectar of love.
I’m here just to bee me,
Dancing to beats from above.

 

close up photo of owl on tree branch

Photo by cmonphotography on Pexels.com

Hear the screech of the owls
As those beauties scan the snow.
The partridge huddle together
Giving each other protection where they go.

Let me be as the creatures
Who share warm love so freely.
Bless their lives in our midst;
They’re naturally touchy-feely!

 

nature bird love heart

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Are you naturally a touchy-feely person?

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