Loving One Another

Posts tagged ‘history’

Halloween is Coming


Halloween is coming; it was
My favorite holiday as a child.
The Wizard of Oz is a theme
That lets your imagination go wild!

Do you have a favorite costume
You wore for Trick-or-Treating fun?
My grandchildren loved to wear
Their costumes. What’s you favorite one?

Yesterday I posted a blog
About my sis and her holiday clothes.
She was a fun and quirky aunt
Who will be missed, Heaven knows!

Do you have a quirky, memorable
Person in your family who knows
Holidays are perfect times to celebrate
And whose cheerfulness always shows?

Our Boston, TazE, will have to be
The costumed member of our family
Who takes that quirky place this year.
Want to Trick-or-Treat with me?

Photo by u0410u043bu0435u043au0441u0430u043du0434u0430u0440 u0426u0432u0435u0442u0430u043du043eu0432u0438u045b on Pexels.com

Just 15 more days to get ready…
Do you celebrate Halloween?
It’s not my favorite holiday anymore …
What does it really mean?

Real Meaning of Halloween

“Hallow” — or holy person — refers to the saints celebrated on All Saints’ Day, which is November 1. The “een” part of the word is a contraction of “eve” — or evening before. So basically, Halloween is just an old-fashioned way of saying “the night before All Saints’ Day” — also called Hallowmas or All Hallows’ Day.

Modern day trick-or-treating is a confluence of various traditions. Ancient Celts dressed up as evil spirits in order to confuse demons, according to Smithsonian Magazine.

In medieval England, “soulers” would go around begging rich folk for “soul cakes” on Halloween. Instead of threatening to play tricks, however, they’d pray for peoples’ souls in return for the cake, according to “The Compleat Teacher’s Almanack.”

Throughout medieval Europe, mummering — dressing in disguises and visiting neighborhoods while dancing, playing music, and doing tricks — was popular on major feast days.

TIME reported Irish and Scottish immigrants brought “souling” to the States in the 1800s. But modern day trick-or-treating didn’t catch on in the US until the 1920s.

The practice was pretty controversial into the 1950s, though. According to the American Journal of Play’s “Gangsters, Pranksters, and the Invention of Trick-or-Treating,” many adults raised “stern objections” to trick-or-treating over the decades, as it was often viewed as a form of extortion.

Thing of the Past?

With adulthood and research, finding out the origins and true meaning of “All Hallows’ Day,” and with the onset of unsafe “treats” being distributed to innocent children by “sick” adults, and with the dangers of this current pandemic, Halloween may have to become a “thing of the past.”

What do you think?

Trick or Treat!
I’d rather have roses than candy!!

Aren’t these beautiful?
They were a gift of cheer –
Wishing us health and
offering condolences
during this crazy week
of roller coaster emotions.


Wasn’t that kind?
If I came “Trick-or-Treating to YOUR door,
what would be your favorite treat to offer?

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com


I’ve been known to hand out a tube of toothpaste and a toothbrush.
With all that candy, the kids’ll need my “treat!”

Love ya, my friends.
Thank you for all your words of comfort.
Hugs –
See ya tomorrow,
JanBeek

150-year-old Church


Back in the mid-1800’s, the land for this church was deeded to the Methodist- Episcopal Church of Madison County. Sometime in the 1860s, around the time of the Montana Gold Rush, this wonderful church was built on the property.

McAllister, Montana

History of the Church

“Brother Van” served as a traveling preacher/minister and had people from miles around come to worship here in the 1850s through to early 1900s.

Sometime in the mid-1900s, the Methodist Church and the Presbyterian Church traded properties from the Ruby Valley to the Madison Valley. As the story goes, there were not enough folks in each valley to support both a Presbyterian and a Methodist church in such close proximity to one another. (These denominations are so close in theology and worship practices!) So, this church building joined the Presbyterian family while the Ruby Valley Presbyterian Church became a Methodist worship center.

Use of the Church Today

The church has no running water, but it does have electricity. Once a year, in early September, the Madison Valley Presbyterian Church in Ennis holds services out there in the McAllister Church. Porta-potties are brought in. And it is a challenge to provide coffee and goodies for fellowship in this waterless place! But, the service always is a memorable experience.

Looking at the front of the worship center
Looking toward the back (Bob in doorway)
On the side wall… notice the picture; here’s a close-up of it:
Precious picture!
When we first came here about 15 years ago, this pump organ actually worked. I wonder what it would take to get it operational again?
Isn’t this a grand old stove? It’s in the kitchen behind the pulpit area. I wonder how they cooked here with no water? Must have had a well outside, you think?
There is a place out this back door where it looks like a well once was.

Future of the Church

Last week we had wind gusts up to 62 mph here in the Madison Valley. A few of the roof pieces blew off in the storm. So, we were out here yesterday with a roofer, getting a bid on what it would cost to repair or replace it.

Seeing the trucks on the property, several neighbors, new to the area, came to check it out. It’s a curiosity for those who have never been inside, and they were glad to be invited in.

This dear gentleman, new to Montana, even offered to help with the roofing project. We hope he retires soon from his home in California and moves with his family to our “Paradise on Earth” full time so we can become better acquainted – and take him up on the offer to help.

Donnie – my new friend!

Meeting New people

Do you enjoy meeting new people as much as I do? Donnie is a firefighter in California. He and his wife have built a home in those mountains you see behind him there. Welcome to Montana, Donnie! Nice meeting you!

I hope Donnie and his wife, Cheryl, will come and visit us… you, too, my friends.
We have an “open door” policy. Come and enjoy this “Big Sky Country” with us.

Birthday and Anniversary


And by the way,
Happy Birthday today to my dear son-in-law in Switzerland,
Andre’ Solioz…
and De & Andre’s anniversary is tomorrow.
Wish we could be there to help them celebrate!

That’s me kissing Andre’ !!
Happy Anniversary tomorrow to my dear daughter, DeDe, and her fun-loving hubby!

Have a wonderful Saturday.

I hope YOU have a lovey-dovey day, too…
Enjoy it, wherever you are!!

Hope you enjoyed those photos of our wonderful old church.
Do you have old buildings in your area
that are worthy of preservation?

I bet some of you have places
that make an 1800s church
look like it’s
NEW!!

Have a wonderful Saturday.

Thanks for visiting JanBeek.
See ya tomorrow.

Must We Die for Freedom?


History of Memorial Day

Memorial Day is an American holiday. This Memorial Day weekend feels very different from years past. Even though we are not having lock-down, stay-at-home orders in Montana, still most of us don’t feel free to have a large gathering with a picnic potluck as we usually do. We need to find new ways of honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military.

Memorial Day is this Monday, May 25th, a day for us in the USA to honor the men and women who died while serving in the United States Military. It was originally known as Decoration Day after the tradition of decorating soldiers’ graves with flowers. Women in Pennsylvania began this practice as early as 1864 following the end of the Civil War. Soon other states and cities did the same.

Waterloo, New York, held an annual community-wide event beginning in 1866. This led the town to be recognized as the birthplace of Memorial Day by the federal government in 1966. Memorial Day became an official federal holiday in 1971. In 2000, Congress passed a resolution, urging Americans to set aside 3:00 p.m. on Memorial Day “to observe a national moment of remembrance to honor the men and women of the United States military who died in the pursuit of freedom and peace.” 

Thank you, Shutterstock, for this image.

Do You?

Do you celebrate Memorial Day? If so, how are my fellow Americans planning on celebrating Memorial Day this year?

I’m curious: How do those of you in other countries remember the people in your nation who have served in your military (or do you)?

Photo by Markus Spiske temporausch.com on Pexels.com

Wonderful Dream

Wouldn’t it be a wonderful dream-come-true to have us all just love one another? No fences, no walls, no borders, no nation against nation… just one world, unified, working in tandem for a better life for everyone?

Wouldn’t it be a dream-come-true if we all felt a sense of freedom without anyone having to die to maintain it?

Wouldn’t it be a wonderful dream if everyone stopped hoarding and just shared generously? Share toilet paper! Share the Good News! Share LOVE!

… a pet, and toilet paper
and a lotta LOVE!

Our military generously give their ALL.
The least we can do is give them a day of Gratitude for their service…
and a dream that one day we will all live as ONE,
end all wars, and live in PEACE!

God bless you, my dear Blogging family.
I pray that you have a peace-filled weekend.
I’ll see you tomorrow.

Hugs, JanBeek

Wait, don’t leave until you comment!!
Tell me about how you honor your military
or tell me about your dreams for ONE WORLD of LOVE!

Find Contentment


Paul Holdorf – Singing Sky Photography

Contentment

Paul Holdorf posted the following beautiful, eloquent essay on FaceBook today to accompany his wonderful photograph above. Do yourself a favor and take time to live in the scene with Paul and me for awhile. I am still there… in the arms of love and contentment.

No further comment from JanBeek necessary. Just savor Paul Holdorf’s creativity. ❤

“I can’t help but wonder what life was like for the occupants of this home. One might at first say that life sure is easier now, but is it? To be sure, it was a hard life, but it must be so rewarding to directly benefit from hard work. Very few things had to be purchased. Most things were made from whatever was available. A hard days work did not have to be converted to cash in order to benefit the family. The same soil that had to be scrubbed out from under fingernails, when properly tilled and watered, grew food for the table. It also grew food for the livestock that in turn also provided sustenance for the inhabitants of this home. As I stood there, I could hear the life that once resided here. A chair scraped on the rough wood floor as Dad got up to go make sure all was well outside before darkness settled in. The children helped clear chipped and faded dishes from the table as Mom brought in a pale of water to rinse things off. There was enough light left for several hours of exploration, so soon the distance sounds of laughter blended in with the clanking of dishes and the splash of dirty dishwater being thrown out the open door. Next to the door, in the corner of the room, stood an old broom, patiently waiting to remove the gravelly evidence of an evening well played. Later, after the children were all played out and tucked into a crowded bed, a silhouette could be seen in the warm light of the setting sun. Out in the yard, next to the swing hanging from a tree, a tired but fulfilled couple sat on an old log bench with their arms around each other. She leaned her head on his strong shoulder, and he thankfully leaned his head over hers. They watched the golden light dip behind the distant mountains and spread a blanket of oranges and reds over the high mountain valley much like the bedspread that would soon bring warmth and comfort to this couple. They work hard, they sleep when the sun sleeps and rise with it in the morning but it is a good life. Nothing is wasted, and everything is wisely used. I walk away from my daydream as they drift off to sleep. Stars begin to twinkle and an owl calls from its roost out in the forest. Rest and rejuvenation fill weary bodies with readiness for the next day, when they’ll do it all over again with joy and contentment in lives well lived.”

Montana Sunset


Montana Sunset
from Virginia City Hill

VC Firetruck tour8

Virginia City, Montana

Last night I was invited to join 16 other friends on an old firetruck tour of our nearby “Ghost Town” – old mining town – still our Madison County capitol – Virginia City.

The tour began around 7:45 pm. The driver spoke non-stop into his microphone and gave us a history of this town where gold brought 60,000 people to live and mine in the period from 1863 to around the beginning of 1900.

Sunset over the Tobacco Root Range

We watched the sun set as we listened to the fascinating stories of the Old West.

IMG_8620

Headed through the little one main road town on Highway 287, we passed the old courthouse, built in 1876, still beautiful and useful today.

VC Firetruck tour3

Heading up the hill, we passed the welcome sign, acknowledging that VC has been “Resisting change since 1863.”

VC Firetruck tour4

About 200 people call this home year-round … maybe double that number in the summertime. But, it’s a great tourist trap. Check it out on your AAA brochures! They give it 5 stars, I think.

VC Firetruck tour5

There are plenty of old homes on Main Street (287) and the street just above it. Don’t miss Elling House and the old stone Episcopal Church a couple blocks up the hill. Also, the old Opera House, with its great Vaudevillle type performances, at the west end of town is a must see!

VC Firetruck tour9

The sky kept getting prettier and prettier!

VC Firetruck tour10

We stopped at the top of Virginia City Hill by an old cemetery for some appetizers at about 8:45 pm…

VC Firetruck tour15

…and continued to admire the sunset.

VC Firetruck tour12

It was dazzling!

And as the sliver of a moon began to shine in a darkening sky, we headed home.

VC Firetruck tour14 moon

I hope you had a lovely Wednesday evening, too.

Have a great Thursday!
Just love one another…

red and white ribbon
See ya later!

Paying Attention


For those of you who are new to following JanBeek,
let me explain.

I take sermon notes in poetry when I listen
to the Pastor’s message each Sunday.

Here are my notes from today’s sermon.
It was preached by a guest in the pulpit,

Retired Presbyterian minister (and friend of mine),
Rev. Steve Hundley. What a gift!!

belief bible book business

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

Paying Attention
(a reflection on the Scripture in Luke 2:21-40)

When we remember our history
And travel thoughtfully through it,
We take a journey of understanding
To truly comprehend life as Jesus knew it.

We can’t take a plane through Christmas
And miss the trip along the way.
We need to slowly walk before and after
And bring Jesus into our life today.

Mary and Joseph probably had a hard time
Understanding the meaning of Jesus’ birth.
There they were in Bethlehem
Wondering what this baby really was worth.

Simeon told them Jesus was “The Light.”
His power would bring glory to the Israeli people.
That must have puzzled those in the temple.
God’s spirit came upon those under the temple steeple.

Have we, like Simeon, seen God’s salvation?
Do we know the Redeemer has come?
Jesus came to honor roots and bring wings.
He came for eternal life for all – not just some.

God is with us every day of our life.
We can’t fly in and out of the Christmas season.
We need to come, meet, greet, and stay.
For Christmas is every day – for good reason!

Amen?

P.S.
Sometimes we have to take the LONG ROAD
in order to make it Home.

Heartache


The Hearings

The heartache

Of yesterday’s

Dying day

Will live on

In our memories

As cinders

In the heap

Of society’s sorrows.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: