Loving One Another

Halloween is Coming


Halloween is coming; it was
My favorite holiday as a child.
The Wizard of Oz is a theme
That lets your imagination go wild!

Do you have a favorite costume
You wore for Trick-or-Treating fun?
My grandchildren loved to wear
Their costumes. What’s you favorite one?

Yesterday I posted a blog
About my sis and her holiday clothes.
She was a fun and quirky aunt
Who will be missed, Heaven knows!

Do you have a quirky, memorable
Person in your family who knows
Holidays are perfect times to celebrate
And whose cheerfulness always shows?

Our Boston, TazE, will have to be
The costumed member of our family
Who takes that quirky place this year.
Want to Trick-or-Treat with me?

Photo by u0410u043bu0435u043au0441u0430u043du0434u0430u0440 u0426u0432u0435u0442u0430u043du043eu0432u0438u045b on Pexels.com

Just 15 more days to get ready…
Do you celebrate Halloween?
It’s not my favorite holiday anymore …
What does it really mean?

Real Meaning of Halloween

“Hallow” — or holy person — refers to the saints celebrated on All Saints’ Day, which is November 1. The “een” part of the word is a contraction of “eve” — or evening before. So basically, Halloween is just an old-fashioned way of saying “the night before All Saints’ Day” — also called Hallowmas or All Hallows’ Day.

Modern day trick-or-treating is a confluence of various traditions. Ancient Celts dressed up as evil spirits in order to confuse demons, according to Smithsonian Magazine.

In medieval England, “soulers” would go around begging rich folk for “soul cakes” on Halloween. Instead of threatening to play tricks, however, they’d pray for peoples’ souls in return for the cake, according to “The Compleat Teacher’s Almanack.”

Throughout medieval Europe, mummering — dressing in disguises and visiting neighborhoods while dancing, playing music, and doing tricks — was popular on major feast days.

TIME reported Irish and Scottish immigrants brought “souling” to the States in the 1800s. But modern day trick-or-treating didn’t catch on in the US until the 1920s.

The practice was pretty controversial into the 1950s, though. According to the American Journal of Play’s “Gangsters, Pranksters, and the Invention of Trick-or-Treating,” many adults raised “stern objections” to trick-or-treating over the decades, as it was often viewed as a form of extortion.

Thing of the Past?

With adulthood and research, finding out the origins and true meaning of “All Hallows’ Day,” and with the onset of unsafe “treats” being distributed to innocent children by “sick” adults, and with the dangers of this current pandemic, Halloween may have to become a “thing of the past.”

What do you think?

Trick or Treat!
I’d rather have roses than candy!!

Aren’t these beautiful?
They were a gift of cheer –
Wishing us health and
offering condolences
during this crazy week
of roller coaster emotions.


Wasn’t that kind?
If I came “Trick-or-Treating to YOUR door,
what would be your favorite treat to offer?

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com


I’ve been known to hand out a tube of toothpaste and a toothbrush.
With all that candy, the kids’ll need my “treat!”

Love ya, my friends.
Thank you for all your words of comfort.
Hugs –
See ya tomorrow,
JanBeek

Comments on: "Halloween is Coming" (2)

  1. For us, Christmas is the big holiday. Halloween is a comparatively recent addition. When I lived in London children would come to the door with their parents lurking outside – just in case.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, that’s the case here, too, Derrick … parents always with them… we live far enough out that walking to our door for Trick-or-Treating is not an option. Lately (until this year with COVID) the children of Ennis have gone to the school gym for a Halloween Festival instead of going door-to-door. They go booth-to-booth, play games, and win their treats as booth prizes. It’s sponsored by our local Lion’s Club. A much safer alternative!

      Liked by 1 person

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