Loving One Another

Archive for the ‘books’ Category

A Year of Rumi


On FaceBook today I found this jewel:

A Year of Rumi

By Andrew Harvey

52,192 people have taken this course

When the great Sufi mystic and poet Jalal-ud-Din Rumi died at sunset in Konya, southern Turkey, on December 17, 1273, he had composed over 3,500 odes, 2,000 quatrains, and a vast spiritual epic called the Mathnawai. Now with A Year of Rumi from acclaimed Rumi scholar Andrew Harvey, you will receive a hand-selected poem from this incredible visionary’s life work every day for the next year – that’s 365 poems from the 13th century.

Increasingly, Rumi is being recognized as the unique spiritual genius he is, as someone who is fused at the highest level and with the greatest possible intensity the intellect of a Plato, the vision, passion and soul-force of a Christ or Buddha, and the extraordinary literary gifts of a Shakespeare. Rumi is, not only the world’s greatest mystical poet, but also an essential guide to the new planetary spiritual renaissance that is slowly emerging from the ruins of our civilization. He speaks to us from the depths of our own sacred identity, and what he says has the electric eloquence of our innermost truth. No other poet or philosopher has Rumi’s almost frightening intimacy of address, and has conveyed the terror, rapture and wonder of awakening to Divine Love with such fearless and gorgeous courage, such humility and such unflinching clarity. “The daily poems have become a routine part of my morning, and they always seem to resonate with difficulties that I am currently facing. That means that each morning, I am given a few minutes to just consider the meaning behind my choices, the value behind what I care about, and ways to better love those closest to me. These few minutes have become a centering time of self-actualization.”You are not a drop in the ocean. You are the entire ocean, in a drop.

One of the world’s foremost Rumi interpreters, Andrew Harvey began a life-long exploration and explication of Rumi and Sufi mysticism in Paris in 1984, with a group of French Sufis and under the guidance of Eva De Vitray-Meyerovitch, the magnificent translator of Rumi into French. This collection of versions of Rumi by Andrew Harvey contains some of the master’s most luminous verse, along with some of his lesser-read poems, with the aim of presenting a balanced view of his teaching that includes both the high-flying love of God and the rigorous path of discipline essential for those who seek it.

“Stop acting so small. You are the universe in ecstatic motion.”

“Whatever lifts the corners of your mouth, trust that.”

“Yesterday I was clever, so I wanted to change the world. Today I am wise, so I am changing myself.”

“Be like a tree and let the dead leaves drop.”

“I have been a seeker and I still am, but I stopped asking the books and the stars. I started listening to the teaching of my Soul.”

“In the blackest of your moments, wait with no fear.”

“These pains you feel are messengers. Listen to them.”

“Close your eyes, fall in love, stay there.” Actual course participants share their experiences

“I just started my year of Rumi and it is one of the best gifts I could ever give myself!”

“Rumi brings me closer to God than I have ever been. I feel as though Rumi lives within me and I, him. I hope to find through this course that Rumi can help me let go and let God.”

“Rumi is the truth. The whole world it is in danger – how we can change that only by love? To love each other and not by words, but by actions. Love is the universal law. We live in world with no boundaries, no walls and no control. We are free and do not want to be controlled.”

“Have you not spent hours gazing at the night sky under a spiraling Milky Way in utter joy? Rumi must have done that. His oneness with All is everywhere explicit in this work.”

“Rumi messages are very spiritual and deep, sometimes it takes me a few days to get the real meaning, but the process is what is about to open up and seek deep within you.”

“Rumi has the ability to always connect with the Almighty, as if in tune.”

“I have found that every time I read a Rumi poem it immediately resonates within my soul, my spirit. I use to be in quest for the perfect Rumi poem; however, I have found that each are so loving and beautiful that they are expanding inside of me. The more I take them in the more they grow and the deeper the feelings of these gems go inside my soul, my spirit. There is a personal journey commencing for me and I find that there are few words to adequately explain what I am feeling but that of the feeling of joy.”

“I enjoy receiving the daily translations in my inbox, it delights my soul to relish in all that is Rumi. I have a greater appreciation for the simple pleasures of life because of his poetry. He inspires me to create not from the mind, but to feel and think with the soul.” About Andrew Harvey

Andrew Harvey is an internationally renowned religious scholar, writer, and teacher, and the author of over 30 books, including the critically acclaimed Way of Passion: A Celebration of Rumi, as well as The Hope: A Guide to Sacred Activism, Journey to Ladakh, The Return of the Mother, Son of Man, and The Direct Path: Creating a Journey to the Divine Using the World’s Mystical Traditions. He is also coauthor of the best-selling The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying. His work has been honored with the Benjamin Franklin Award and the Mind Body Spirit Award (both for Mary’s Vineyard: Daily Readings, Meditations, and Revelations, with photographs by Eryk Hanut), and the Christmas Humphries Award for A Journey in Ladakh. Born in south India in 1952, Harvey studied at Oxford University and became a Fellow of All Soul’s College in 1973. He is Founding Director of the Institute for Sacred Activism.

This article inspired me to look more deeply into this 13th century genius. My blogging. Writers’ Group friend, Lilie Allen (@ WordPress Tea, Toast and Kindness) often quotes him. I think this 365 page book of selected writings by Rumi sounds promising.

What do you think?

Staying Out of the Cold


I posted earlier today from my cell phone while we were up at Big Sky. Bob was enjoying a day of skiing with Nancy, his ski buddy, while I was inside making new friends, keeping warm, and reading the book that our Ennis Book Club will be discussing at tomorrow’s meeting.

I also browsed the shops at the Big Sky mall and photographed a few things (taking them home in my camera is way better than buying them!).

I enjoyed the trip to Big Sky from Ennis. The snow was so beautiful!

But once we arrived at the ski area, I was more than happy to avoid the cold and stay in the lodge. Some of you may think that’s crazy; others of you may relate. I didn’t learn to ski as a child, broke my leg as a teen, took a long time to heal, and have a fear of falling down and breaking it again. I prefer to stay in the lodge!

A Guy Named Kenny

Before Bob & Nancy could get from the parking lot to the lodge (where they had dropped me off), I met a guy named Kenny. Well actually, he met me. I was sitting quietly in the corner with my book when he approached me. Told me I reminded him of his grandma. I learned all about his family … and was in deep conversation with him when Bob & Nancy arrived. Even got his grandma’s chicken soup recipe! (Should have taken Kenny’s picture for you!) Nice guy!

Montana Jack’s

After Bob & Nancy went up to ski, I went to Montana Jack’s for an Irish coffee. I was sitting with my book at the bar, sipping my drink when a guy about my son’s age sat down and struck up a conversation with me. I found out he was from Colstrip, MT and his wife is a child psychiatrist working with Autistic children. The darling, young waitress treated me to a delicious piece of apple pie to go with my coffee. She adopted me as her Grandma and so did my new friend from Colstrip (I love it).

Back Home Again

Returning home, we nearly got stuck in the drifts that had blown onto our driveway. I was reluctant to go out again, but Bob really wanted to treat me to a Happy Anniversary dinner at our favorite Ennis restaurant, The Alley Bistro. So, we braved the weather and had a great evening. We managed to return home and inch our way through the snow drifts safely. It was a Happy Anniversary indeed. Thanks for all your good wishes.

58 years… now that’s something to celebrate!
While Bob & Nancy enjoyed the slopes at Big Sky, I enjoyed staying inside and making new friends. Can you relate?
I hope you live long enough to celebrate your 58th, too…
And with the love of your life!
Life is beautiful!!

Bedtime

Time for bed…
but first I have to finish that book.
Somehow today I didn’t get much reading done.
Had too much fun making new friends.
Can you relate?

See ya tomorrow.
Good Night!

Let's Be Whole!


We are a divided country.
The words “they” and “them”
are heard more frequently today
than ever before in my 80 years of life.

What is causing this?
And what can we do about it?
Here is one man’s suggestion.
I think it is so true.

Right on!
It’s as true in China (where the Corona virus is rampant,
and citizens are bravely speaking out against
a government that acted slowly
on the knowledge of the virus),
as it is in the USA where
election rhetoric
is hateful and divisive.

So how do we begin to “fight for each other?”

From his prison cell in Rome, Paul wrote to the people of Colosse. He had visited there before his imprisonment. His letter to them in the book of Colossians was written to encourage them, just as we, the people of this divided world, need encouragement today.

Colossians 2: 1-3
“I want you to know how much I am struggling for you… and for all those who have not met me personally. My purpose is that they may be encouraged in heart, and united in love, so they may have the full riches of complete understanding, in order that they may know the mystery of God, namely Christ, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.”

Colossians 2:8
“See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the basic principles of the world rather than on Christ.”

Colossians 3:12-14
“Therefore… clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive what ever grievances you may have against one another… And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.

Photo by Wendy van Zyl on Pexels.com

Yes, the Bible has words of wisdom, words of advise for ALL in times of trouble. We need only open its pages to find scripture that directs our paths toward the unity we all seek. In Colossians, Paul tells us to put on:

  • compassion
  • kindness
  • humility
  • gentleness
  • patience
  • LOVE

… and in so doing, we will find the peace of Christ living in our hearts.
We are members of one body.
We are ONE.
We need to know that without a doubt
and act accordingly.

Don’t let hateful rhetoric divide our oneness
into the “they-them” and “we-us” mentality!

We’re all in this together.
Let’s be whole!

Thanks for visiting JanBeek.


Have a Marvelous, Love-filled Monday!

See ya tomorrow.

Live to Give


Good Friday Morning to you!

Each morning

I start my day up here

in my sanctuary

at the top of

our circlular staircase.

Come and join me today!

 

Here we sit

in the presence of the Holy Spirit,

who fills our hearts.

It’s a peaceful place.

I read, pray, meditate, and listen.

God’s amazing grace fills our souls.

.

“These Days” daily devotional

After reading the scripture

and the reflections on it,

by Michael Morgan of Atlanta, Georgia,

I added a few words boldly to the page.

 

These three words represent

my “take away” for today.

Yes, I want to “Live to Give.”

 

I hope that’s your take-away, too.

 

Thank you, Michael,

for the inspiration and the prayer

at the bottom of the page.

I, too, hope to “Live into [God’s] goodness.”

My heart beats with God’s love as its fuel. .

May you also “Live to Give” today – and always.

 

Have a Fabulous Friday! .

Come and join me again later

 

when I go to volunteer

 

at our Madison Valley Medical Center.

pexels-photo-887349-2

See ya later.

Expert Advice


If you were seeking

Expert advice, expert care,

Where would you look for it,

Where would you go?

 

Depends on the need –

Depends on the problem –

Depends on the availability

Of the help you seek, right?

 

.

If you’re asking about medicine,

a doc or pharmacist can share

what they have been trained to know,

But they might not be the best bet for food.

.
ham burger with vegetables

Who do you ask when you’re looking for a super burger?

 

I needed good advice today

For the best spot to go

for a veggie burger.

Surprisingly, my dental hygenist

knew just the place!

Five Guys menu . I got a veggie sandwich here.

It was delicious.

You never know who might help

when you seek advice.

 

I didn’t know Five Guys even existed!

I’ll go back – it was fresh,

Service was good,

and the price was quite reasonable.

 

Just remember, it never hurts to ask.

Expert advice may be

right around the corner.

And from a most surprising source!

 

If it’s spritual advice

you are seeking,

Don’t overlook that handy dandy book

that may be gathering dust

in the corner of your bookshelf!

   

Oh no, not you!

Your favorite books never gather dust,

right? .

img_7781

 

I start each day with this one.

Great advice contained in there!

 

It was a busy day today.

I went to Bozeman mid-day

for my routine dental appointment.

Accomplished a lot while in the “city.”

 

Now it’s time for bed.

I may ask TazE for her expert advice

on how to get a long, sound sleep!

bed bedroom cute dog

See ya tomorrow.

They’re All Carrots


They’re All Carrots

orange carrots on table

Photo by mali maeder on Pexels.com

In My Devotional Today

Rick Hamlin likened our act of praising God to the act of munching on a handful of carrots.

Rick said he ate carrots as a kid not because some adult said they were good for his eyes or his health, but simply because he liked them.

“Whoever said the things that are good for us
have to be hard or come as a result of great struggle
or simply taste yucky?” Rick Hamlin asked.
“Think of… the carrot, not the stick,
about how people are motivated by rewards
rather than threats or punishment…
Praise, thankfulness, enthusiasm,
kindness – they are all carrots, not sticks.”

Carrots in the Classroom

When I was in my last two years of teaching, before I retired (from public education, but not from working) in 1999, I had a group of second graders that I had taken on from first grade.

Our classroom “Discipline Plan” was a set of rules with rewards. They were as sweet as honey! Our classroom theme was a garden. Bees (with the students’ names on them) flew above, in, and around the bulletin board garden. In the soil were listed rules such as “Bee Courteous,” –  “Bee Honest” – and  “Bee Helpful.” A favorite one was “Lettuce Carrot for One Another.”

pexels-photo-1340369.jpeg

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels.com

If a student was caught BEEing good, exhibiting one of the characteristics mentioned in the rules of conduct, their bee would “fly” into my apron pocket – the pocket with a heart on it. A heart would be drawn on their bee’s body. At the end of the day, the bee flew back into the paper garden, and the thoughtful child added a paper seed to their garden plot on the bulletin board. At the end of the week, all bees that had hearts on them would have their seeds traded for a plant – a vegetable or fruit or flower to “grow” in their plot. (I wore a different colored apron each day of the week – inspired by Patricia Mckissack‘s book, “Ma Dear’s Aprons.” It’s one of my favorite children’s books.)

 

Just that little act of recognition – taking the bee down, tucking it into the heart pocket, and saying, “Thank You for BEEing ________,” – encouraged more students to do likewise.

Carrots in Our Daily Walk

If we “carrot” for one another on a daily basis, we will find ourselves munching on praise, thankfulness, enthusiasm, and kindness. Our gardens of compassion will grow, and we’ll bee happier people. Guaranteed!

We need to carry lots of “carrots” – and eliminate the “sticks”  – on our daily walk. Thank and praise God for the acts of kindness and compassion shown to us each day. Bee caught BEEing good!!

 In today’s devotional in Guideposts,
Rick Hamlin went on to say,
“God likes us to praise Him because it’s good for us.
It feels good.
The words are sweet in our mouths,
nourishing, crunchy, and satisfying. Irresistible.
Like munching on a handful of carrots.”

vegetables market basket carrots

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com


Praise God! And thank Him for His wonderful blessings.

Then go out and pay it forward.
Remember you are blessed to be a blessing.
It’s all a bunch of carrots!
Meant to be shared…

Munch on love!

heart of love
See ya tomorrow!

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