Spreading love, joy, peace, faith & unity

Only in Snowy Places?


Today’s blog is inspired by a conversation I had this morning with Ruthie, my son’s mother-in-law.

Photo by Matu Bil on Pexels.com

Up pops the crocus leaves
Tiny sprouts of green
Signaling winter’s end –
A very welcomed scene.

Only in snowy places
Do crocus flowers grow.
What makes that a fact?
I’d really like to know.

So I checked it out
With a quick click or two
And learned about this flower.
Does its beauty attract you, too?

In her article about gardening, Marie Iannotti wrote the following about crocuses: “Growing from bulb-like structures called corms, crocuses are low-growing perennial plants from the iris (Iridaceae) family. In many regions, crocus flowers (Crocus spp.) mark the arrival of spring. These early bloomers can often be seen peeking up through the snow well before any other flowers appear on the landscape. They grow in a range of conditions, including woodlands, coastal gardens, and suburban lawns. Bloom colors on the tube-shaped flowers include mauve, lavender, and yellow. …”

The crocus in our yard are this gorgeous color of lavender. I wasn’t aware that they also come in mauve and yellow, are you?

My daughter-in-law’s mom, Ruthie, grew up in Switzerland and has lived her adult life in southern California. Speaking with her this morning, telling her about the crocus that are popping up in our yard, she said, “I haven’t seen a crocus since I was a child in Switzerland. They only grow where there’s snow.”

That got me thinking and wondering … and as you read above, they actually grow in a range of conditions. I intend to send her a few “corms” as an Easter gift next week – and I will be very curious to see if they will grow in her yard. She lives not too far from Los Angeles … certainly a place where snow is not expected! But, Marie Iannotti included “suburban lawns” as a place they grow, so we’ll see.

Not quite the same as her Swiss mountainside, huh?

What are some things
that you might expect to see
only in snowy places?

Let’s find a few images
that come to mind:

Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com
Snowdrops

I love snowdrops. We don’t have any of these in our yard. Gotta remedy that!!

I did a little research on these flowers too, and learned this from Longfield Gardens’ site: “Like other spring-blooming bulbs, snowdrops use their foliage to generate energy for next year’s flowers. Resist the temptation to cut back the leaves or mow them down while they are still green. Within a couple weeks, the foliage will yellow and melt away on its own.

When snowdrops are growing in a location that suits them, the bulbs will multiply and can eventually carpet a large area. The bulbs don’t mind being crowded and rarely need dividing. If you want to move some bulbs to a new area or share them with friends, dig and divide them in early spring, right after flowering and before the foliage begins to yellow. Handle them carefully so the foliage stays attached to the bulbs, and get them back into the ground as quickly as possible.

You may find it takes a couple years to establish large clumps of snowdrops, but once the bulbs have naturalized, you will have flowers every spring for generations to come.”

What springtime flower inspires you?

I hope your home is blessed with a colorful,
sweet smelling, beautiful gift of flowers today.

If I could send you a few “corms”
as an Easter gift, I would!

Bee well!
I send you my love and hugs this day.
Thanks for visiting JanBeek.


See ya tomorrow (God willing).

Comments on: "Only in Snowy Places?" (4)

  1. Anonymous said:

    A glowing post. We have no trouble with any of these, and we hardly ever see snow

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hah! But you, my friends, are exceptional gardeners. Not everyone has the skill to make every kind of flower grow so beautifully, you know?

      Like

  2. Dana Pulliam said:

    “For oft, when on my couch I lie
    In vacant or in pensive mood,
    They flash upon that inward eye
    Which is the bliss of solitude;
    And then my heart with laughter fills
    And dances with the daffodils.”

    As with Mr. Wordsworth, my heart dances each spring when I see daffodils in bloom.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: